Table of content A-Z

 

loganberry

 

Botanical name: Rubus loganobaccus

 

 

These berries are sold chiefly in the USA, Great Britain and New Zealand. The plant is rarely found in Germany, because it has a low yield and is not completely hardy.

 

Availability

The fruits reach full ripeness in July and August. They are relatively unknown here and available only rarely, primarily imported from New Zealand. With a little luck you may find them tinned in a well-assorted supermarket.

 

Appearance, taste, characteristics

The loganberry is said to be a cross between a variety of blackberry and an American raspberry and named after the breeder, J.H. Logan. Whether it was a planned hybrid or one that occurred by accident in nature is not exactly clear.

The berries grow to 3-5 cm, are cone-shaped and may be anywhere from wine-red to dark red. They are particularly juicy and have a pleasantly sour aroma. Because they are sensitive they should be picked, transported, and stored very carefully.

 

Ingredients

Worthy of special note are the vitamin C and fibre contents of fresh loganberries. Just 100 g can supply an appreciable portion of the recommended daily requirements.

With regard to all other nutrients, the loganberry is very similar to the blackberry and the raspberry.

 

100 g contain:

 

Loganberry, fresh

Loganberry, jam

Loganberry, tinned

Energy (kcal)

26

265

70

Water (g)

87

32

80

Protein (g)

1.1

<1

<1

Fat (g)

1

0

1

Carbohydrates (g)

3.4

64

16

Fibre (g)

5.6

2.1

3.1

Organic acids (g)

2.4

0.9

1.4

Vitamin A (RE) (µg)

13

3

7

Vitamin C (mg)

35

1.3

11

Folic acid (µg)

14

1

5

Potassium (mg)

260

97

118

Sodium (mg)

3

1

2

Calcium (mg)

35

14

22

Magnesium (mg)

25

9

13

Iron (mg)

1.4

0.7

0.7

Manganese (µg)

900

338

487

 

Quality criteria, optimal storage conditions

When completely ripe the fruits are quite sensitive. They must be handled carefully, like blackberries and raspberries.

It is best to store the berries in a large container in the refrigerator, to avoid bruising. Like many other berries, they should be washed only just before use, and not before they are stored. In this way they will keep for 2-3 days.

 

Form of consumption, use, processing, practical tips for preparation

Loganberries are used to produce juices, jams and wine. They are also excellently suited for desserts. Serve them as compote, or top a tasty sponge cake with a mixture of several types of berries. No matter how you use them, loganberries will lend your dishes a delicately tart aroma.

 

Miscellaneous

Caution: The fruits have deep calyxes in which insects can easily hide. Wash them carefully and sort them thoroughly.

 

 

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