Table of content A-Z

 

apricot

 

Botanical name: Prunus armeniaca


Aprikose / Marille

 

The apricot originally came from China. Today it is cultivated in many warm countries, chiefly in the Mediterranean region, and there above all in Turkey. In Germany, apricots thrive only in areas that have a wine-growing climate.

 

Availability

Apricots are available from May to September. In July and August they are in especially large supply, and in this period domestic produce is also sold.

 

Appearance, taste, characteristics

Apricots are 4-8 cm, round to egg-shaped, and have a groove on one side that divides the fruit into two parts. Its skin is yellow to orange, sometimes also reddish, and usually rough and furry, although it is smooth in some varieties. The pulp can be white, yellow or orange and comes away from the stone easily. Ripe fruits taste sweet-sour and are juicy.

 

Ingredients

Apricots are especially rich in carotene (provitamin A). With dried apricots the content is much higher. In addition they contain a large amount of potassium.

 

100 g contain:

 

 

Apricot, fresh

Apricot, tinned

Apricot, dried7

Energy (kcal)

42

781

250

Water (g)

87

78

20

Protein (g)

<1

<1

5

Fat (g)

<1

<1

<1

Carbohydrates (g)

9

181

51

Fibre (g)

2

2

11

Vitamin C (mg)

9

22

43

Vitamin A (RE) (µg)

298

2452

1589

Carotene (mg)

1.8

1.5

9.5

Folic acid (µg)

4

12

18

Potassium (mg)

280

1633

1654

Sodium (mg)

2

2

12

Calcium (mg)

17

18

100

Magnesium (mg)

10

10

59

Iron (mg)

0.6

0.5

3.8

Note: As this is a natural product, and as the information is taken from various sources and therefore from different analyses, there may be fluctuations in the nutritional facts. The minerals in particular may fluctuate, since the plant takes these from the soil, the composition of which itself can vary. Its mineral content is influenced, for instance, by fertilization. The footnotes are explained here .

 

Quality criteria, optimal storage conditions

The colour of the fruit is no indication of its quality or ripeness. Even when they have a nice colour on the outside, this is not necessarily a sign of good flavour.

 

If the pulp is easily removed from the stone, this is a sign of ripeness. Apricots that are harvested while still unripe will subsequently take on a strong colour but not more aroma. Domestic fruits are almost always left to ripen correctly on the tree - the transport routes are short - and therefore are usually very aromatic.

 

Ripe fruits can be kept for about 4 days at room temperature. Apricots become dry and wrinkled in the cold, so they should not be put in the refrigerator.

 

Form of consumption, use, processing, practical tips for preparation

Apricots are best suited for eating fresh. However, they can also be used to top cakes or made into jam and compote. Apricot dumplings, an Austrian specialty, are particularly delicious.

 

The skin is easier to remove if the fruits are put into boiling water briefly and then rinsed with cold water.

 

The food industry produces above all tinned and dried apricots. Apricot cordials are also in demand. The oil-containing seed found in the stone of the fruit can be processed as well. It is made into a paste similar to marzipan (known as persipan), used as a substitute for almond oil in the confectionery industry.

 

 

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