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manioc

 

Synonym: cassava; botanical name: Manihot esculenta


Maniok

 

Thousands of years ago manioc, or cassava, was a staple food in tropical America. After America was discovered by the Europeans, manioc also became known in Spain and Africa, as well as in Asia.

Manioc is grown today mainly in countries with a moist tropical climate, where it is still frequently a staple of the diet.


Availability


The manioc root is long and tapered toward the end. It can be up to 100 cm long and 20 cm thick. The skin of the irregularly shaped tubers is dirty white to brownish, while the pulp is white. The plant is threaded with milk canals which carry the extremely bitter, poisonous cyanogenic glucoside linamarin. When the tissue is damaged, an enzyme releases hydrogen cyanide from the linamarin. Cooking or roasting destroys the poison, however. Manioc has a neutral taste and is somewhat mealy. Depending on the variety, it can also be sweet or bitter.


Ingredients


100 g contain:

Maniok,
fresh
Energie (kcal)
137
Wasser (g)
63
Eiweiß (g)
1
Fett (g)
< 1
Kohlenhydrate (g)
32
Ballaststoffe (g)
3
Vitamin C (mg)
30
Vitamin A (RÄ) (µg)
5
Folsäure (µg)
24
Kalium (mg)
344
Natrium (mg)
1
Calcium (mg)
32
Magnesium (mg)
65
Eisen (mg)
1,2
Kupfer (mg)
0,2
Mangan (mg)
0,6



Quality criteria, optimal storage conditions


At 5–7°C manioc will keep for about 2 weeks.


Form of consumption, use, processing, practical tips for preparation


Because of the poisonous substances mentioned above, manioc may not be eaten raw. Before it is prepared further, the root must be peeled and cut in half, and the middle vein must be removed. Then the roots can be prepared like potatoes, either as a vegetable side dish or puréed.

People in the countries where it is grown also bake flat cakes out of manioc.

Industrially, starch is made from manioc. This is used as a thickening agent, or a binder. In addition, alcohol can be made from manioc.

The manioc leaves are also edible when cooked and can be prepared like spinach.


Seasoning tip


Parsley, salt and garlic go well with manioc.

 

 

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