Table of content A-Z

 

plum

 

Domestic plum: Prunus domestica

Damson/German prune: Prunus domestica ssp. insititia

Greengage: Prunus domestica ssp. italica

Mirabelle/yellow plum: Prunus domestica ssp. syrica


Pflaume

 

The plum probably stems from the original wild plum native to the area around the Caspian Sea. It spread from Syria to Greece and later to Italy. Today, plums are grown and eaten all over the world.

 

Availability

From May to December, plums and damsons are sold. From mid June to mid October they are in plentiful supply. This is when domestic produce is available.

 

Mirabelles and greengage plums can be bought from June to September; they are most plentiful in July and August.

 

Appearance, taste, characteristics

The collective term 'plum' is used in general for various types of fruits that differ in size, colour, juice content, aroma and ripening season. The most important subspecies are:

 

Plums:
* round shape
* marked longitudinal seam
* blue-purple, rarely red skin
* yellow pulp
* soft, juicy pulp that falls apart when cooked
* rather difficult to remove stone
* divided into European, Japanese and West Asian varieties

 

Damsons/German prunes:
* oblong shape with tapered ends
* usually without longitudinal seam
* blue or purple skin
* yellow pulp
* firm, juicy pulp that does not fall apart when cooked
* easily removed stone

 

Greengages:
* round, medium-sized
* longitudinal seam
* green-yellow skin, sometimes shot with red; rarely red
* firm, yellow, juicy pulp
* sweet, honey-like flavour
* difficult to remove stone
* The German and French names Reneklode and Reineclaude, respectively, stem from the name of the wife of the French King François I, Claude, who liked to eat this fruit (reine = queen). In the English-speaking world the fruit is named after the man who brought it from France to England in the 18th century: Thomas Gage.

 

Mirabelles/yellow plums:
* round and small
* yellow skin with red dots on the cheeks
* yellow pulp
* firm, sweet pulp
* very easily removed stone

 

By means of hybridization, many varieties have been created that cannot be classified under one of these sub-species. Sloe plums (Prunus spinosa) are also stone fruits or drupes, and look like small, spherical plums. You can read more about them here.

 

The fruits of all of the above-mentioned groups often have a whitish waxy coating that protects them from drying out.

 

Ingredients

100 g contain:

 

Plum, fresh

Plum, dried

Plum, preserved

Mirabelle, fresh

Damson, fresh

Greengage, fresh

Energy (kcal)

47

261

721

64

43

63

Water (g)

86

20

79

82

86

81

Protein (g)

1

3

0.5

1

1

1

Fat (g)

<1

1

0.1

<1

<1

<1

Carbohydrates (g)

10

57

17.21

14

9

14

Fibre (g)

2

9

n.a.*

1

2

2

Vitamin C (mg)

5

22

1.52

7

4

6

Vitamin A (RE) (µg)

61

304

112

35

49

30

Carotene (mg)

0.4

1.8

0.7

0.2

0.3

0.2

Folic acid (µg)

2

11

n.a.*

3

3

3

Potassium (mg)

220

1218

1183

230

240

245

Sodium (mg)

2

11

12

0

2

1

Calcium (mg)

14

78

10

12

13

13

Magnesium (mg)

10

55

n.a.*

15

8

10

Iron (mg)

0.4

2.4

1.1

0.5

0.4

1.1

*n.a.: no data available

 

Note: As this is a natural product, and as the information is taken from various sources and therefore from different analyses, there may be fluctuations in the nutritional facts. The minerals in particular may fluctuate, since the plant takes these from the soil, the composition of which itself can vary. Its mineral content is influenced, for instance, by fertilization. The footnotes are explained here .

 

Quality criteria, optimal storage conditions

Unripe damsons are recognizable by their reddish skin. This indicates that they were harvested too early. The fruits hardly ripen after being picked and are very sour and have little flavour.

 

The ripeness of plums, mirabelles and greengages cannot be deduced from their colour. You will have to see if they yield to slight pressure from your finger.

 

If you want to be sure about their flavour you will have to try one.

 

Ripe fruits should be eaten as quickly as possible. Damsons keep a bit longer. It is recommended that you keep them in the refrigerator without having first removed the white film.

 

Form of consumption, use, processing, practical tips for preparation

In addition to being eaten fresh, plums are suitable for many other purposes, whether as compote, purée, damson cheese, jam, desserts or as a cake topping. In addition, various alcoholic drinks are made from plums. The best-suited for this are the damsons with their firm pulp. Dried plums, or prunes, can be added to desserts, cooked as compote, or added to meat dishes. Prunes covered with marzipan, or plums wrapped in bacon that can be served as a starter, are also popular.

Prunes are recommended as a natural laxative.

 

Varieties of plums with firm pulp can be frozen after the stone has been removed. They can be kept in the freezer for about 1 year.

 

Seasoning tip

Cinnamon, lemon zest, vanilla, cloves and anis taste good with plums.

 

 


 

  With the website www.the-green-pantry.com the Fritz Terfloth Foundation of Münster offers consumers independent and competent information about plant foods and their health effects. All texts are subject to German copyright law. Information about the conditions for use of the texts by third parties can be found here.


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