Table of content A-Z

 

Sea-buckthorn berry

 

Botanical name: Hippophae rhamnoides


Sanddorn

 

 

Sea buckthorn is an undemanding plant that grows wild, above all in coastal regions and in the mountains. In 1971, several attempts to cultivate it were begun in Germany. The fruit is grown commercially chiefly for industrial purposes.

 

Availability

Sea-buckthorn berries are rarely seen for sale. They are found sporadically at weekly markets or from direct sellers between August and October. These are then berries picked by hand from wild stock. Sea buckthorn can be bought as a decorative plant in flower shops.

 

Appearance, taste, characteristics

Sea-buckthorn berries are orange to red, small, and the size of peas. They taste intensively sour and tart.

 

Ingredients

Sea-buckthorn berries are extraordinarily rich in vitamin C; 100 g contain more than four times the daily requirement of this important vitamin. A characteristic feature of the berries is the, for fruit, uncommonly high fat content. They also contain carotenoids and phytosterines, both secondary plant substances.

 

100 g contain:

 

Sea-buckthorn berries, fresh

Sea-buckthorn berries, cooked

Energy (kcal)

94

98

Water (g)

81

81

Protein (g)

1

2

Fat (g)

7

7

Carbohydrates (g)

5

5

Fibre (g)

3

3

Vitamin C (mg)

450

2711

Vitamin A (RE) (µg)

250

240

Folic acid (µg)

10

62

Potassium (mg)

133

116

Sodium (mg)

4

3

Calcium (mg)

42

45

Magnesium (mg)

30

32

Iron (mg)

0.4

0.4

Note: As this is a natural product, and as the information is taken from various sources and therefore from different analyses, there may be fluctuations in the nutritional facts. The minerals in particular may fluctuate, since the plant takes these from the soil, the composition of which itself can vary. Its mineral content is influenced, for instance, by fertilization. The footnotes are explained here.

 

Quality criteria, optimal storage conditions

Once the fruits look pale they no longer taste and smell good. You can keep the berries in a plastic container in the refrigerator for about 1 day. They can also be frozen or dried.

 

Form of consumption, use, processing, practical tips for preparation

It is not common to eat sea-buckthorn berries raw, but the numerous products made from them are quite popular. Jellies, jams or syrup taste good whether home-made or industrially processed. Sea-buckthorn berries are frequently mixed with dairy products: milkshakes, sea-buckthorn yogurt and sea-buckthorn ice cream are tasty summer refreshments.

 

Sea-buckthorn berries are also good for baking. They are used industrially above all to enrich various products with vitamin C. The seeds and pulp of the berries contain oil that is used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

 

Seasoning tip

Ginger, cardamom, vanilla, cloves and cinnamon taste good with sea-buckthorn berries.

 

Miscellaneous

Sea buckthorn is under nature conservation.

 

 

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  With the website www.the-green-pantry.com the Fritz Terfloth Foundation of Münster offers consumers independent and competent information about plant foods and their health effects. All texts are subject to German copyright law. Information about the conditions for use of the texts by third parties can be found here.


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